epa Photo Essays 2013

 Hap Haeimel (R) dances with his date at the National League of Junior Cotillions' Holly Ball in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, 05 December 2013. The program, features character education, etiquette, manners, and social dance training for fifth-through eighth-grade students, includes five classes and two balls over an eight month period. Cotillion is designed to give young people instruction and practice in social courtesies, ballroom dancing and to provide opportunities to practice and use these skills at events. EPA/ERIK S. LESSER

Etiquette and Ballroom Classes for Children

Teresa Libbey teaches children the art of manners and etiquette. As a local chapter director for the National League of Junior Cotillions, her three-year program works to teach fifth grade through eighth grade children. Children of all social backgrounds are encouraged to learn social courtesies needed for better relationships with both family and friends. The students learn and practice life skills and ballroom dancing not offered elsewhere. Libbey works to teach 'gentlemen and ladies' self-confidence and character, and helps set boundaries of behavior. In addition, the group offers proper manners and guidelines for email, cell phones and other electronic communication.

 

 

US James Joseph, a Catholic pilgrim originally from Detroit, Michigan, touches the picture of Jesus at the Church of the Holy Sepulcher at the Old City of Jerusalem, 07 May 2013. Joseph calls himself Jacob but is better known by many as ‘the Jesus guy’, mainly because of his appearance resembling Jesus Christ. He has visited about 20 countries in the world, spreading his message, and over recent years he has been visiting Israel, becoming a well-known figure in the old city of Jerusalem, where he explores the life and path of Jesus Christ. EPA/ABIR SULTAN

The Jesus Guy

Barefoot, dressed in white robes, James Joseph, a Catholic pilgrim originally from Detroit, Michigan, USA, has been living without money and depending on the generosity of others for the past 20 years. He calls himself Jacob but is better known by many as ‘the Jesus guy’, mainly because of his appearance resembling Jesus Christ. He has visited about 20 countries in the world, spreading his message, and over recent years he has been visiting Israel, becoming a well-known figure in the old city of Jerusalem, where he explores the life and path of Jesus Christ.

 

 

epa03973939 (01/29) A file picture dated 30 July 2003 shows a Liberian child government gunman at the 'Old Bridge' returning from firing across at (LURD) Liberians United for Reconciliatrion and Democracy rebels on the other side in Monrovia, Liberia. This was the twelveth day of continued fighting for the capital despite the call for ceasefire. EPA/NIC BOTHMA

Liberia - Ten Years of Liberation

In 2003, the civil war in Liberia culminated in a final battle for Monrovia after 14 years of civil war. The city was surrounded by warring factions and for weeks the citizens bore witness to one of the bloodiest battles in West Africa's history. Finally, the then president Charles Taylor, who has since been found guilty of war crimes, stepped down under immense international pressure. Since then, Liberia has enjoyed 10 years of liberation and peace, with Ellen-Johnson Sirleaf becoming the nation’s first democratically-elected female president in 2005. She was faced with a massive task of restoring Liberia from a crippled nation into a functioning country.

 

 

A Syrian asylum seeker mother and her son in their flat in Alexandria, northern Egypt, 10 December 2013. They fled Idlib in December 2012 because of the war. Now they survive thanks to some money from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), and also received the yellow card identifying them as asylum seeker. Since the start of the conflict in Syria back in 2011 hundreds of thousands of Syrians have fled the country seeking refuge from violence they face both from government forces and from various rebel factions. Most civilians had to flee with their families and any savings they had to neighboring Jordan, Libya, and Turkey while many others reached Egypt or Algeria, where visa was not required for them to enter the territory. EPA/PAU RIGOL

Syrian Refugees in Egypt

Since the start of the conflict in Syria back in 2011 hundreds of thousands of Syrians have fled the country seeking refuge from violence they face both from government forces and from various rebel factions. Protests muted to a long and ongoing conflict culminating in 2013 by the use of chemical weapons and tens of thousands of deaths. Most civilians living in the conflict areas had to flee with their families to neighboring Jordan, Libya, and Turkey while many others reached Egypt or Algeria, where visa was not required for them. In Egypt most of the about 300,000 Syrian refugees do not have to live in refugee camps; they stay in rented accommodations in Cairo and Alexandria.

 

 

A woman walks back to her home after a morning shopping in the Bairro Alto district of Lisbon, Portugal, 26 November 2013. Located in the heart of Lisbon, Bairro Alto celebrates 500 years on 15 December 2013. EPA/MARIO CRUZ

500th Anniversary of Bairro Alto

The Portuguese capital celebrates the 500 years of the district of Bairro Alto. Built in the 16th century, it became one of the most emblematic and cosmopolitan quarters of Lisbon. It has traditionally been a cultural center where writers, poets, artists, students and journalists often gathered. In the eighties, it started becoming a renowned quarter for a vibrant nightlife. While the neighborhood is quiet during the day, a multitude of small bars, Fado houses, and restaurants attract many tourists at night. Bairro Alto has recently welcomed many young people rejuvenating the neighborhood and leading to the restoration of many old buildings in bad conditions.

 

 

A file picture dated 10 November 2013 shows 11-year-old supertyphoon survivor Joshua Cator scavenging for food and reusable material in destroyed houses in the devastated city of Tacloban, Leyte province, Philippines. EPA/DENNIS M. SABANGAN

Typhoon Survivor Joshua Cator

With his first photograph Joshua gained notoriety. Only 11 years old, Joshua Cator has seen and experienced more than most people do in their lifetimes. The boy is among those who survived super-typhoon Haiyan after it crossed the Philippines leaving thousands dead in its wake. A portrait of Joshua taken two days after the disaster was used by local and international non-government organizations to solicit help for typhoon victims. His picture looked like a cry for help and here is Joshua’s story. The tragedy, however, has not changed Joshua’s plans for the future.

 

 

A file picture dated 03 May 1961 shows US President John F. Kennedy and First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy following arrival ceremonies for H. E. Habib Bourguiba, President of Tunisia, at Blair House, in Washington, D.C., USA. 22 November 2013 marks the 50th anniversary of John F. Kennedy assassination on 22 November 1963 at Dealey Plaza in Dallas, Texas, USA. Lee Harvey Oswald was accused of the shooting and was later killed himself on 24 November 1963 by a gunshot by Jack Ruby. EPA/ABBIE ROWE / NATIONAL PARK SERVICE HANDOUT EDITORIAL USE ONLY/NO SALES

John F. Kennedy Assassination - 50th Anniversary

US President John F. Kennedy was fatally shot while traveling in a presidential motorcade in Dealey Plaza in Dallas, Texas, USA, on 22 November 1963. Lee Harvey Oswald was accused of the shooting and was later killed himself on 24 November 1963 by a gunshot by Jack Ruby.

 

2013 marks the 50th anniversary of US President John F. Kennedy's assassination.

 

 

 

Four year old Filipino boy Kim Froiland poses for a portrait in the super typhoon devastated city of Tacloban, Leyte province, Philippines, 19 November 2013. Kim, living in the Anibong area close to the waters edge in a shack, lost his home but survived the storm by fleeing to higher ground with his family. They have now returned to the area and are rebuilding their home. EPA/NIC BOTHMA

Children of Haiyan

On 08 November 2013 typhoon Haiyan, known as Yolanda to the Filipinos, slammed into the Eastern Philippines with record winds of more than 300 kilometers per hour destroying more than a million houses. The children that survived have harrowing tales and an imprint in their memories that will last through their lifetime. Law and order reinforcements arrived and restored control and residents could begin salvaging their lives. For the children this meant looking for their relatives, water, food, lost possessions, helping their parents and finding shelters to stay in. The resilience of the Filipinos throughout this disaster is incredible and reflected in the spirit of these children, who continue to play and smile and laugh.

 

 

epa03935360 (09/24) Thai lotus farmer Usa Mahmueangbon picks lotus flowers in her family's lotus and water lily farm in Saladin village, in Nakhon Pathom, about 50 kms west of Bangkok, Thailand, 28 August 2013. Every second day to allow for re-growth of the flowers Usa Mahmueangbon and her sister wade into the 2.4 hectare cultivated waters to hand pick about 1,500 lotus flowers that are then sold to a wholesaler who take them to market for further onward sale as decoration temple offerings and food. Delicious and beautiful, Thai food is appreciated the world over for its striking tastes and surprising combinations of sweet and salty, spicy and sour. But lesser known is that flowers also bloom in Thai cuisine, they appear as essential ingredients in popular dishes, as snacks sold at street stalls in the form of battered flower fries, to specialty dishes at local restaurants, to full banquets in five-star hotels promoting extensive floral banquets. EPA/BARBARA WALTON

Flower Food

Delicious and beautiful, Thai food is appreciated world-wide for its striking tastes and surprising combinations of sweet and salty, spicy and sour. But lesser known is that flowers also bloom in Thai cuisine, flowers appear as essential ingredients in popular dishes, as snacks sold at street stalls in the form of battered flower fries, to specialty dishes at local restaurants, such as steamed lotus leaf parcels, as well as in full banquets in five-star hotels that promote extensive floral banquets. Thailand's creative chefs want to further combine the visual beauty of flowers with fragrant new and old tasting dishes, highlighting floral ingredients in the food.

 

 

epa03929598 (03/25) Two Alex residents pose for a photograph in the Alexandra Township, Johannesburg, South Africa, 18 September 2013. Despite being one of the poorest urban areas in the country 'Alex' today is a vibrant, colorful township with a livelier inter-active community than the most expensive real estate in Africa, Sandton City – just a stone's throw away. Its major connectivity to fame goes back to 1943 when Nelson Mandela stayed for a short time while studying at the University of South Africa. EPA/KIM LUDBROOK

Nelson Mandela's Alexandra Township

Alexandra township in Johannesburg is one of the main townships on the edges of the capital and was built in the early 1900's to house nonwhite residents. Townships like Alex, Diepsloot and Soweto were built outside the main white areas as a cornerstone of the country’s controversial Apartheid policy. They were often the venues for uprisings against the government as black South Africans fought for equal opportunities. In 1943 Alex became famous when Nelson Mandela rented a room in the house of the Xhoma family before moving to Soweto. The dwellers enjoy an open society; children playing games, adults enjoying dice and card games and a wide array of small businesses.

 

 

epa03909253 (01/34) A Ford Escort passes behind a customized VW Beetle during the 2013 Kalahari Desert Speedweek at Hakskeenpan, Northern Cape of South Africa, 21 September 2013. The Speedweek sees motorsport enthusiasts gathering in a remote desert in the north of the country to drive their vehicles across seven kilometers of specially prepared clay track for high speed top end runs. Technically the desert Speedweek is more challenging than Tar Speedweek and requires much more driving and engineering skills for top honours in each class including cars and bikes. EPA/NIC BOTHMA

Kalahari Desert Speedweek

In its second year the 2013 Kalahari Desert Speedweek brought together an eclectic mix of speed crazed petrol-heads from various corners of South Africa. The course runs along 7 kilometres of specially prepared clay track for high speed top end runs. Technically it is a much more challenging event than Tar Speedweek and requires much more driving and engineering skills for top honours in each class. The Speedweek is not just for exotic sports cars. It is aimed at the man in the street. Be it in an old Ford truck or a Lamborghini drivers get to test their nerve and steel in pushing themselves and their vehicles to top speeds across the desert.

 

 

epa03910650 (23/23) A non poisonous snake moves around the yarn near a dyeing unit in Fulia, 97 km north of Calcutta, eastern India, 15 September 2013. The region has over 125,000 handlooms, churning out Shantipuri, Tangail, and Jamdani handloom sarees in a variety of fabrics like cotton, tussar and silk. However the craft of making sarees is declining in the recent years as most of the weavers are forced to give up due to financial reasons. The weavers quit their profession in this traditional business and work as labourers in different fields, as the low salaries they receive are not enough to cover their daily needs. The average earning of a weaver family is in the range of 150–200 euro per month. EPA/PIYAL ADHIKARY

Saree Weaving in Bengal

Every lane of Fulia in West Bengal vibrates with the sweet sound of running looms. The town keeps its unique identity with a backbone of handloom businesses and 80 per cent of its residents involved in the textile trade. West Bengal is famous for its handloom products with over 125,000 handlooms churning out Shantipuri, Tangail, and Jamdani handloom sarees in a variety of fabrics like cotton, tussar and silk. Weaving is an old crafting in this Indian region and started in Bengal in 1409. However the craft of making sarees is declining in the recent years as most of the weavers are forced to give up due to financial reasons.

 

 

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Wild Orangutans at Borneo National Park

Wild orangutans have little room left to maneuver. Their forest homes are shrinking at an alarming rate and their future is on the line. Orangutans are large red haired arboreal great apes living up to the age of 50 years. They are only found in natural rainforest habitats on the islands of Borneo, where they are classed as endangered, and on Sumatra, in Indonesia, where they are critically endangered. Once they were found across south-east Asia, today their habitat has shrunk, and as the demand for more land and more wood progresses, their places of abode are getting smaller and smaller each year.

 

 

epa03900344 (08/12) Marble statues are sprinkled throughout Calvary Cemetery, where Father William Bowdern, the priest who led repeated exorcisms on Roland Doe in 1949, is buried in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA, 19 March 2013. None of the priests who participated in the rite are still alive. Father Bishop's diary of the case includes the following account of Father Bowdern's involvement, dated 18 March 1949: 'Next the Fathers began the Litany of the Saints, as indicated in the exorcism ritual. In the course of the Litany, the mattress began to shake. (Roland) was awake. The shaking ceased when Father Bowdern blessed the bed with Holy Water. The prayers of the exorcism were continued and (Roland) was seized violently so that he began to struggle with his pillow and the bed clothing. The arms, legs, and head of (Roland) had to be held by three men.' EPA/JIM LO SCALZO

The True Story Behind The Exorcist

In 1973, the movie 'The Exorcist' became a sensation in the United States; when adjusted for inflation it is the ninth highest grossing film in American history. Yet few realize that the movie, and Peter Blatty's novel of the same name, are based on a true story: a months-long exorcism by Jesuit priests of a 14-year-old Maryland boy, who priests assigned the pseudonym Roland Doe, in 1949.

 

 

 

epa03892160 (21/30) Young children march during training at a summer boot camp on the outskirts of Beijing, China, 07 August 2013. Running in its fifth year, the youth military summer camp first opened in 2008, when it only had a handful of students signed up. Today the camp caters to over 2,000 kids a year over a two month period. The camp is ran mainly by former military, police, and fire fighters, looking after kids ranging from 6 to 17 years of age, with 70 percent being boys and 30 percent girls. EPA/DIEGO AZUBEL

Summer Boot Camp

The youth military summer camp first opened in 2008. Today the camp caters to over 2,000 kids a year over a two month period. The camp is ran mainly by former military, police, and fire fighters, looking after kids ranging from 6 to 17 years of age. The camp's average child is what it is known as the 'little emperor': an overprotected kid, product of the one child policy. Most parents enroll their children for the one to four week program. Depending on the program they learn how to do their laundry, sit still at attention, go on treks, or learn self-defense.

 

 

epa03890643 (06/24) Chinese model Qiwen Feng (C) looks at her smartphone as she commutes on the subway to a fashion show during the Spring/Summer 2014 Ready to Wear Paris Fashion Week, in Paris, France, 28 September 2013. EPA/YOAN VALAT

Two Days with Qiwen Feng

Qiwen Feng made her debut as a model in 2008 in her native city of Chongqing, China. Her career brought her to Shanghai and then to New York City. The Spring/Summer 2014 fashion week is Qiwen’s second season in the French capital. The daily schedule during Paris Fashion Week is hectic, made up of fittings, castings, fashion shows and photo sessions. Her aspirations are high but as she presents the creations for Dries Van Noten, Felipe Oliveira Baptista and John Galliano in Paris she seems very much on the path towards becoming a super model.

 

 

epa03885630 (07/25) Laszlo, only first name available, is reflected in a mirror of his home in Bekescsaba, 201 kms southeast of Budapest, Hungary, 18 September 2013. Laszlo, 67, suffering from autism, is intensly interested in data of geographics, history, culture and sports and he systematically notes these data down. EPA/PETER KOMKA

Living with Autism in Hungary

The tenth Autism-Europe International Congress is held in Budapest, Hungary, from 26 to 28 September 2013. The congress is held every three years. This year the organizing association Autism-Europe celebrates the 30th anniversary of its founding. This Photo Essay offers an insight of the lives of people suffering from autism, a pervasive developmental disorder of the brain functions preventing a person from organising and understanding information. The symptoms are deficits in social reciprocal interaction, in verbal and non-verbal communication and imagination and in limited range of activities and interests.

 

 

epa03889491 (23/31) Migrant villagers of Cangfang town gather to board buses for relocation to the neigbouring Hui county, more than 500 kilometers away, to make way for the South-to-North Water Transfer project in Xichuan county, Henan Province, China, 29 June 2010. The South-to-North Water Transfer project, the largest known water diversion project, was conceived in 1952 to solve the country's chronic water shortages and involves creating three routes to channel 44.8 billion cu m of water from southern China to the northern areas. As part of the project's central route, affecting Henan and Hubei provinces, water from the Danjiangkou reservoir will be diverted to Beijing. Parts of Xichuan county, a remote, mountainous region inaccessible by railway and home to 162,000 migrants, will be submerged by water from the Danjiangkou reservoir in 2014. The vast resettlement of affected residents in Xichuan county began in August 2009 and lasted until 2011. EPA/HOW HWEE YOUNG

South-to-North Water Transfer Project

In June 2010 a batch of villagers from Cangfang in Xichuan county of Henan province loaded their belongings and lined up to board a long line of buses. Amid tearful embraces, the villagers bid their remaining relatives and friends farewell and began their journey to cross the Danjiangkou reservoir and more than 500 kilometers of mountainous roads and dusty highways to start their new lives in resettlement villages in Hui county. The relocation of more than 330,000 people was part of the South-North Water Transfer project. It was conceived in 1952 by former Chinese Chairman Mao Zedong to solve the country's chronic water shortages.

 

 

epa03863792 (01/16) A horse is led by a boy on railroad tracks next to huts in a slum inhabited by a Roma community in the Craica neighbourhood of Baia Mare, north-western Romania, 05 September 2013. This year the local government planned to demolish shanties of the Craica slum and move hundreds of residents to a new housing estate of 500 light structure, modular homes to be set up in the outskirts of Baia Mare. EPA/ZSOLT CZEGLEDI

Roma Ethnic Minority in Baia Mare

The living conditions of the Roma community in the shantytown called Craica remains unchanged except that things are a bit easier in summer. Baia Mare has a population of about 150,000 people and lies near the Romanian borders with Hungary and Ukraine. But they are considered as illegal squatters and plans to relocate them for the better are in abeyance. The slum area has no clean water and only a limited electricity supply. Selling scrap iron salvaged from abandoned mines in the area is their main source of income. Since 2011, local authorities have been demolishing shanties and rehousing Roma families.

 

 

epa03862188 (13/32) A crab shanty, along with a pier loaded with crab traps, is illuminated by lights from a nearby marina under a night sky on the Smith Island town of Tylerton, Maryland, USA, 12 June 2013. EPA/JIM LO SCALZO

Changing Tides on Maryland's Smith Island

In the middle of Maryland's Chesapeake Bay a tiny island may soon become an early victim of climate change. Smith Island is the last inhabited island in Maryland, a place where residents still speak in the Cornish dialect of their ancestors. Many Smith Islanders can trace their ancestry back 12 generations to the English colonists who settled here in the 17th century. And yet their link to this land may soon be broken: Smith Island is eroding. Though scientists differ on how long it will be before the island is underwater there is no dispute about the cause: rising seas. According to a state-commissioned task force, Maryland is now losing 260 acres of tidal shoreline annually.

 

 

epa03831313 (15/15) A foreign tourist eats a fried scorpion insect at Khao Sarn road, a spot tourist area in Bangkok, Thailand, 20 July 2013. Insects have long been on the menu in Thailand, but academics and the United Nation's Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) officials are hoping they will become a more common global source of protein and nutrients to meet the need for growing world food requirements in the future. EPA/NARONG SANGNAK

Edible Insects

Insects have been on the menu in Thailand for ages and recently they have migrated from the forests to commercial farms and factories. Over the past 15 years, Thailand, a leader in the region in terms of farming insects and processing them, makes in average 7,500 tons a year of insects – mainly crickets, palm weevils and bamboo caterpillars. Insects are becoming a popular snack at tourist spots, such as Khao Sarn Road, and are generally sold on carts on the street along with other delicacies such as water bugs and silk larvae.

 

 

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Living with AIDS in Uganda

In 2005 Nakisozi Mastulah's husband died of AIDS. The same year she was also diagnosed with HIV. Her local community prevented her children playing with other youngsters in the fear that they would be infected. She started a group with other HIV positive residents to enlighten the community about their disease. Mastulah's group has now 457 registered members. This initiative makes mosquito-repellent candles, note-books and bakes cakes that they sell afterwards in order to pay back their loans and to cover the costs of HIV-related expenses.

 

 

epa03830525 (02/22) A racehorse is washed after training at the Alag racecourse and training centre in Dunakeszi, Just north of Budapest, Hungary, 10 July 2013. The first Hungarian Derby galloping race took place in 1921 at the Alag racecourse and training center. Today the center serves as 350 stables, a 2,800m gallop course and a steeplechase-cross country course, and is a training ground for many Hungarian racing thorougbreds. EPA/Laszlo Beliczay

Horse Racing in Hungary

The Hungarian Derby is a popular gallop race with nearly ten thousand people attending the races at Kincsem Park, others prefering to follow the event from home or a betting office. Bets worth 5,500 euros (7.5 million forints) were placed on horses participating in the derby, with a total of over 85,600 euros (24 million forints) on horses participating in all of the ten races of that day. The first Hungarian Derby took place in 1921. Today the center serves as 350 stables, a 2,800m gallop course and a steeplechase-cross country course, and is a training ground for many Hungarian racing thoroughbreds.

 

 

epa03825399 (04/16) Ukrainian artist Alexey paints a graffiti artwork on a building on occasion of the Graffiti Festival in Moscow, Russia, 27 July 2013. About 150 graffiti objects are planned to appear in industrial zones of Moscow and some other capital’s districts during the summer. The graffiti festival 'The best city in the world' was organized by the Moscow Government, with support of PIK Group and the fund 'Social projects and programs'. EPA/YURI KOCHETKOV

Moscow Graffiti Festival

The festival ‘Best City On Earth’ has been launched in the Russian capital with the grand opening of the first of 150 graffiti objects starting to renew the city’s look. The project opened on 18 May 2013 when Russian artist Alexey Mednoy unveiled his giant graffiti piece ‘Circus’ on the side of a house in central Moscow. The street-art and graffiti project is organized by the Moscow government, with support of the real estate and homebuilding company PIK. Until September, new works by street artists will appear regularly on the walls of residential houses and office buildings, power substations, bridges, and subways.

 

 

epa03821799 (06/18) Cathrine Okello, member of the Community Savings and Loaning (CSL)group Ugambe 97, poses in front of her new stove kitchen in Sega, North Ugunya, Kenya, 05 June 2013. All 'Ugambe 97' members are Christians and put on uniforms during their meetings to feel equal amongst each other. The group focuses on socio-economic empowerment in their community and their microfinance is based on CSL principles, such as saving money, which is the source of loan capital which they can borrow. EPA/CRISTINA VAZQUEZ

Community Savings and Loaning

Kenya is still struggling with a low electrification rate. Almost 90 per cent of the country’s households use firewood for cooking. Nearly all of the rural households collect firewood themselves, which keeps residents busy for five to 20 hours per week. The ‘Carbon Offset Project’ was launched by Swiss nonprofit climate protection organization myclimate in 2010 and partners with Tembea Youth Centre for Sustainable Development, a community based development organization, to implement the Community Savings and Loaning methodology in Siaya County.

 

 

epa03815370 (01/19) A tourist slides across a rope during a ninja training tour in the town of Nabari, Mie prefecture, Japan, 21 July 2013. Nabari is the home of Japanese ninja, which were mercenaries in feudal Japan specializing in espionage, sabotage, infiltration, and assassination. Ninja were most prominent in 15th century Japan. The town of Iga is trying to promote their ninja heritage to attract tourism and improve the faltering economy. EPA/EVERETT KENNEDY BROWN

Ninja Town

Iga and Nabari are homes of Ninja, most prominent in the 15th until 17th centuries but antecedents may have existed even in the 12th century. A Ninja figure was originally an agent or mercenary specializing in unorthodox warfare – sabotage and assassination topping the list of expertise. A number of local residents of Iga trace their family roots to the Ninja dating back some 15 generations. Secret Ninja texts are preserved in local archives and local residents are experts in the Ninja arts. And Iga celebrates the Ueno Ninja Festival every year to keep the culture of Ninjutsu alive.

 

 

epa03813555 (19/20) A Japanese Bunraku traditional puppet theatre performer explains how a puppet is manipulated during a demonstration at the National Bunraku Theatre in Osaka, Japan, 22 July 2013. Bunraku puppet theatre was listed as a UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity in 2008 for its unique blend of puppet drama, instrumental accompaniment and sung narrative. Bunraku puppet theatre is in threat of decline due to lack of financial support from the government to foster and promote the 400 year old Japanese theatre tradition. EPA/EVERETT KENNEDY BROWN

Bunraku Puppet Theatre

Bunraku puppet theatre is one of Japan’s foremost stage arts, along with Kabuki and Noh. It was listed as a UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity due to its unique blend of puppet drama, instrumental music accompaniment and song narrative. Bunraku first appeared in the early Edo period (ca. 1600) and has become a popular form of narrative drama depicting historical plays set in feudal times, and contemporary dramas that deal with conflicts between personal passions and social obligations. A growing number of professional performers are voicing deep concern about the future survival of their grand arts tradition.

 

 

epa03796826 (02/23) Under the supervision of Tank Town USA owner Todd Liebross (Top), Lori Lockman crushes a car with surplus 15-ton British FV-432 armored personnel carrier in Morganton, Georgia, USA, 13 July 2013. Lockman, who was celebrating her 50th birthday, received the surprise gift from her husband Jeff. Liebross, a long time collector of military vehicles, started Tank Town USA in April 2013 in the North Georgia mountains, where people can pay 50 US dollars to drive the APC for 10 minutes or 499 US dollars to crush a car. EPA/ERIK S. LESSER

Tank Town USA

Todd Liebross opened Tank Town USA in April 2013 in Morganton after three years of planning and a life-long hobby of collecting surplus military vehicles. On five acres of land, thrill seekers can now drive a British armored personnel carrier across the Georgia red clay, including the opportunity to crush a junked car. For 499 USD a customer can crush a car with the 15-ton treaded vehicles and drive around for 20 minutes. Customers can also choose to operate an excavator or bulldozer or operate an APC for 50 US dollars for 10 minutes of fun.

 

 

epa03806154 (30/30) Kyle Barh stands on the hood of his car and waves his first-place trophy after winning the demolition derby at the Hardin County Fair in Eldora, Iowa, USA, 14 July 2013. Every summer, each of Iowa's 99 counties throws its own fair. Provincial and patriotic, with beauty pageants and demolition derbies, polka dances and daredevil shows, these rural exhibitions reflect the traditional values, and the countrified culture, of America's Heartland. EPA/JIM LO SCALZO

Iowa's County Fairs

Every summer, each of Iowa’s 99 counties throws its own fair. Provincial and patriotic, with beauty pageants and demolition derbies, polka dances and daredevil shows, these rural exhibitions reflect the traditional values, and the countrified culture, of America's Heartland. Though sparsely attended compared to the better-known Iowa State Fair, these small-town gatherings are a source of pride for many Iowans. The fairs run from June through early September.

 

 

 

epa03789369 (01/22) A South Korean woman walks past a giant fish sculpture in Danyang, north-central South Korea, 19 March 2013. Consumption of fish, seaweed and other products are part of Korea's culinary culture. The collection, serving and sale of these sea products drive the economy in many small Korean coastal fishing villages, where busloads of domestic tourists journey to eat fresh at the seaside. Known for its health benefits gained from the natural sea vegetable rich in minerals and vitamins, seaweed production drives South Korea's aquaculture industry. EPA/BARBARA WALTON

Fishing and Aquaculture in South Korea

Fishing and consumption of sea vegetables are integral to South Korea's way of life and culinary culture. The collection, serving and sale of these sea products drive the economy in many small coastal fishing villages along parts of South Korea's 10,000 km and more of coastline. Before the rapid expansion as a leading industrial giant in car manufacturing and the energy industry, fishing and agriculture formed the backbone of its economy. A visit to any one of the many fish markets reveals the fascinating array of sea products consumed and emphasizes the strong domestic demand for fresh sea products.

 

 

epa03782465 (01/15) Filipino mermaid swimming teacher Genevieve Reyes (C) has her tail adjusted by students during a lesson by the Philippines Mermaid Swimming Academy in a private swimming pool in Makati, Manila, Philippines, 15 June 2013. The Philippine Mermaid Swimming Academy (PMSA) was created in 2012 in Boracay by Normeth Preglo of The Philippines and US swimming instructor Djuna Rocha. The swimming lessons were brought to Manila in April 2013. The price for a two-hour class is 37 US dollars. EPA/DENNIS M. SABANGAN

Mermaid Swimming Academy

Swimming gracefully like mermaids: Normeth Preglo of the Philippines had the idea when she was looking for a mermaid costume and slipped on a fishtail. With its curious combination of fun, functionality and whimsicality, many people wanted to experiment mermaid swimming. The swimming lessons were brought to Manila in April 2013 for people eager to try what the pioneers describe as an ethereal 'dream-like' experience. The academy is more focused on swimming classes but to complete the experience, mermaid party packages for children (minimum age being 6) and adults are also offered.

 

 

epa03788523 (09/23) Chinese disabled artist Xi Fu wipes sweat off his forehead after writing Chinese calligraphy with his feet in an underground pass in the shopping district of Xidan in Beijing, China, 15 June 2013. Performing in the streets is not easy as he is often hassled by officers from the urban affairs office. His condition also limits him to work for a maximum of three hours a day; otherwise it becomes too painful for his body to withstand. Xi Fu's story is one that tells of how strong determination and hard work overcame the difficulties of surviving in a society scant with infrastructure and support for the disabled and where they often face discrimination. EPA/HOW HWEE YOUNG

Chinese disabled artist Xi Fu

Surrounded by cloth, paper, brushes and ink Xi Fu whose name meant 'Seeking Happiness' is a common sight in the underground passes of Xidan or tourist walkways of Houhai in Beijing. With spry dexterity, he uses his feet to mix the paint, lay out his brushes and spread the rice paper he is going to write on. Clasping the brush between his toes, Xi Fu proceeds to mesmerize a rapidly gathering crowd for the next hour with a skillful display of calligraphic art using only his feet. Since there are no platforms for disabled artists like him Xi Fu took to the streets and roaming pedestrian underpasses to perform.

 

 

epa03762150 (01/22) Buddhist monks in their orange monk robes standing in front of a Buddhist shrine are caught in light as they visit the Chiang Dao cave in northern Thailand, 14 May 2013. Thais worship and protect their caves, many were once used by Buddhist monks before they built their temples. There are thousands of caves across the Kingdom of Thailand, and many are still being uncovered. EPA/BARBARA WALTON

Thailand's Caves

Caves hold a mystical and religious significance to Thai people. As the first unofficial temples, Buddhist 'cave' monks lived in the natural shelters, before establishing their own temples just outside. In ancient times, caves were also the abode of holy men and ascetics who sat in the dark in deep meditation. There are thousands of caves spread across Thailand and many are still being discovered. These caves are places of wonder and worship but they are fragile environments, easily destroyed and in need of ongoing conservation and protection.

 

 

epa03758879 (09/14) Ram Maya, waits with her eye covered by an eyepatch the following morning after a cataract surgery during a free health camp at Phullari Monastry in Gokarna village, on the outskirts of Kathmandu, Nepal, 24 May 2013. Cataract is the clouding of the eye lens and the most common cause of blindness. The removal of a cataract was never possible in Nepal before 1990, so many elderly sufferers died without treatment said Khim Gurung, a Program Manager of TIO. The official launch of TIO eye program in 1992, with the initiation of Dr. Sanduk Ruit, helped more than 200,000 people improve their vision after receiving the eye surgery. More than 300 elderly men and women from all over the country gathered at the monastery premises recently for free health treatment in their eyes. Among them was Ram Maya, whose succesfull surgery in her left eye enabled her to continue her active work in her plantation, harvesting paddy crops and putting them in sacks to be sold in the market place. EPA/NARENDRA SHRESTHA

Cataract Surgery Free Camp

Seventy year old Nepalese rice farmer Ram Maya Rai toils daily in the paddi fields of the Likhu River, in Nepal’s Nuwakot district, but despite her years she goes about her chores with a new lease of life now that the vision in her left eye has been fully restored. Before 1990, it was never possible in Nepal to remove a cataract - a clouding of the eye lens and the most common cause of blindness. Recently, Ram Maya and more than 300 elderly men and women from all over the country gathered at the monastery premises for free health treatment in their eyes.

 

 

epa03754103 (01/18) A woman touches one of the standing stones as revellers wait to celebrate the Summer Solstice at Stonehenge, near Salisbury, Britain, 20 June 2013. Thousands annually meet at the 5,000 year old stone circle at Stonehenge to see in the sunrise of the Summer Solstice which marks the longest day of the year in the Northern Hemisphere. EPA/KERIM OKTEN

Summer Solstice at Stonehenge

More than 20,000 revelers gathered to celebrate the Summer Solstice on 21 June within the circle of standing stones at Stonehenge, England. Pagans, druids and tourists crossed the country to watch the sunrise at the start of the longest day of the year. Stonehenge became a World Heritage Site in 1986. The neighbouring road A344 close to the site is about to close as part of a 27 million pounds transformation that will re-connect the monument with its landscape and enable visitors to better appreciate the views and access of the site.

 

 

epa03757338 (01/17) Palestinian Jamela Abu Aisheba, 35, sits in front of her home after she finished her work transfering cement at a building plant in Beit Hanoun, northern Gaza Strip, 08 May 2013. Jamela has been working in the cement transporting business for 20 years and she is paid by weight receiving 10 shekels (2 Euro) for raising one ton of cement. EPA/ALI ALI

Jamela, Palestinian Female Cement Worker

The cement plant on the north-eastern edge of the Gaza Strip is no place for the weak-hearted. Its back breaking work for any man, let alone a woman, carrying bags of cement weighing 20 kilograms to and fro. But that is the life of 35 year old unmarried Jamela. She started her career at the factory in Beit Hanoun when she was fifteen. Her arrival first raised eyebrows amongst the all-men staff but her ability to work earned her respect and their acceptance. For her labors she is paid just 10 shekels (around 2 euros) for each one ton of cement she transfers.

 

 

epa03748420 (01/21) Single leg amputee Caroline Larsson from Sweden walks down a fairway at the end of a day's play during the Nedbank South African Disabled Golf Open at Legends Golf course in Limpopo, South Africa, 13 May 2013. The Nedbank South African Disabled Golf Open is one of the top disabled golf tournaments in the world with more than 60 competitors from various nations. People suffering from any number of physical disabilities including arm and leg amputees, hemiplegics, paraplegics, stroke victims, blind and deaf people that are able to grip the club with at least one hand and hit the ball can compete. EPA/NIC BOTHMA

Disabled Golf Open

The Nedbank South African Disabled Golf Open is one of the top disabled golf tournaments in the world with more than 60 competitors from various nations. People suffering from any number of physical disabilities including arm and leg amputees, hemiplegics, paraplegics, stroke victims, blind and deaf people that are able to grip the club with at least one hand and hit the ball can compete.

 

 

 

 

epa03752431 (01/17) An Indonesian employee works at a spinning plant of Sritex textile company in Sukoharjo, Central Java province, Indonesia, 22 May 2013. Southeast Asia's largest textile company, PT Sri Rejeki Isman (Sritex) was founded in 1966 by local entrepreneur Muhammad Lukminto in Solo, Central Java province. It was started as a small garment store at a traditional 'Klewer' market. The integrated company that has three weaving plants, nine spinning plants, three printing plants and seven garment plants is now employing 16,000 people. Sritex supplies military apparels to 29 countries and has been appointed as the official partner for NATO countries to produce military uniforms. EPA/MAST IRHAM

Sritex Textile Company in Sukoharjo

Southeast Asia's largest textile company, PT Sri Rejeki Isman (Sritex) was founded in 1966 by local entrepreneur Muhammad Lukminto in Solo, Central Java province, Indonesia. It was started as a small garment store at a traditional 'Klewer' market. The integrated company that has three weaving plants, nine spinning plants, three printing plants and seven garment plants is now employing 16,000 people. Sritex supplies military apparels to 29 countries and has been appointed as the official partner for NATO countries to produce military uniforms.

 

 

epa03704176 (02/15) A Japanese tea farmer picks the first flush harvest of tea leaves at a mountain farm in Fujinomiya city, Shizuoka prefecture, Japan, 01 May 2013. Due to extraordinarily favorable weather conditions this year, local producers are expecting their best harvest in five years. EPA/EVERETT KENNEDY BROWN

Shizuoka Green Teas Harvest

Shizuoka tea production is booming once again after suffering severe setbacks following the nuclear accident in 2011. The discovery of cesium levels exceeding government-set limits in samplings of Shizuoka tea leaves resulted in shipments of the teas being recalled and destroyed. This severely dented the reputation of teas in the region. With the safety of Shizuoka teas now confirmed international sales are back to normal. Local producers are now expecting their best harvest in five years. The timing is excellent as tea enthusiasts from around the world gather in Shizuoka for World Tea Festival that takes place in Spring and in Fall.

 

 

epa03704290 (19/21) A Palestinian father (C) shows his joy after he was told that he may return soon home with his family (Front) in northern West Bank city of Nablus, as doctors make their rounds in the pediatrics ward of Wolfson Hospital, in Holon, south of Tel Aviv, Israel, 07 May 2013. His baby son (Front C) who underwent an operation about nine days ago is recovering well. EPA/JIM HOLLANDER

Surgery without borders

Israeli-based international humanitarian project 'Save's a Child's Heart' provides cardiac surgery and care for children and builds political bridges for peace in the process. An age-old Jewish tradition of Tikkun Olam is literally at the heart of this project. Many of the heart operations are simple procedures but many of these children die due to a lack of trained local medical staff. This ‘surgery without borders’ approach means that every child deserved the best medical treatment available regardless of nationality, religion, color, gender or financial situation.

 

 

epa03728843 (18/18) Children of the Uighur ethnic group play while cleaning outside their home in the old town of Kashgar, Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region, China, 24 May 2013. Uighurs, a Muslim ethnic minority group in China, make up about 40 per cent of the 21.8 million people in Xinjiang, a vast, ethnically divided region that borders Pakistan, Afghanistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Mongolia. Other ethnic minorities living in the region include the Han Chinese, Kyrgyz, Mongolian and Tajiks people. In the restive region of Kashgar, at the western end of Xinjiang where the North and South Silk road meets, Uighurs comprise of more than 90 per cent of the 3.9 million population. Most practice a moderate form of Islam and religion is a major part of most ordinary Uighurs' lives. Tensions have been high between the Uighurs and the dominant Han Chinese as Uighurs complain of cultural and religious repression and claim that Han Chinese migrants enjoy the main benefits of development in the oil-rich but economically backward region. EPA/HOW HWEE YOUNG

Kashgar's Ethnic Uighurs

In the restive region of Kashgar where the North and South Silk road meets, Uighurs comprise of more than 90 per cent of the 3.9 million population. Most practice a moderate form of Islam. Tensions have been high between the Uighurs and the dominant Han Chinese as Uighurs complain of cultural and religious repression and claim that the migrants enjoy the main benefits of development in the oil-rich but economically backward region. State media have reported several ethnic clashes and terrorist attacks in recent years accusing some Uighurs of having links to terrorist groups in Pakistan, Afghanistan and Central Asia.

 

 

epa03741058 (01/15) A picture taken with a tilt-shift lens shows 73-year-old He Feng Xing seated in front of his home in Luduo, China's Yunnan province, 02 April 2013. Mr He last saw his family when he was quarantined by his father in 1953 at age 13. Close to 80 people affected by Hansen's disease were quarantine in Luduo village when it was first established, but now there are only seven. Five of them, sent to Luduo when they had the disease, and the other two are men who were born in Luduo after their mothers were quarantined while pregnant. In China, most patients were quarantined in mountain villages or islands with little access at all. The majority died in these villages without ever seeing their relatives again, even after they were cured. EPA/DIEGO AZUBEL

Luduo - Leprosy Village in China

Hansen's disease, also known as leprosy, is caused by the bacteria Mycobacterium leprae, which damages the skin and the peripheral nervous system. Hansen's disease became curable in 1941. When diagnosed and treated early, the disease is not disabling and leaves no marks at all. In China, most patients were quarantined in mountain villages or islands with little access at all. The majority died in these villages without ever seeing their relatives again, even after they were cured. According to HANDA hundreds of such villages still exist isolating the last surviving affected people, cured years ago.

 

 

epa03662841 (20/23) Bhawana Thami poses for the photographer at Dusikharka village, Dolakha district, some 345 km from capital Kathmandu, Nepal, 13 September 2012. Kaluman Thami’s third child, Bhawana Thami, was born with half of her face covered with hair, due to a hair mole disease that if not treated could turn into cancer. The family suffered from the local villagers' belief that a child with such an appearance is a witch. Kaluman, a protective father, did not allow his daughter Bhawana to look into mirror, but one day a journalist who took her photo showed it to her causing the child disgust, fear and shock. With the economic support of the organization Child Workers in Nepal and a plastic surgeon in Kathmandu, Bhawana went through her first plastic surgery on 28 February 2012. A year later she had a second operation where the hair from her face was completely removed and she will need a third one when she turns fourteen years old. Bhawana's appearance is changing every day since her operations took place, and now she enjoys all activities at school and local villagers have accepted her and the family after all. EPA/NARENDRA SHRESTHA

Hope for Bhawana Thami

Bhawana Thami was born with half of her face covered with hair due to a disease that if not treated could turn into cancer. The family suffered from the local villagers' belief that a child with such an appearance is a witch. Bhawana’s father did not allow her to look into mirror, but one day a journalist who took her photo showed it to her causing the child disgust, fear and shock. In 2012 Bhawana went through plastic surgery. A year later she had a second operation where the hair from her face was completely removed.

 

 

 

epa03712789 (08/14) A professional conservator works on restoring an old document using a piece of the world's thinnest paper, .002 grams, at the National Archives of Japan in Tokyo, Japan, 13 May 2013. Conservators at the archives are daily involved in restoring some of the 990,000 documents in the archives. To restore the rare and irreplaceable documents, experts use a variety of methods, such as paper patching and leaf casting to restore documents close to their original condition. Japan's National Archives is a world leader in restoration techniques and offers traditional and modern Japanese technology and technical training to institutions around the world. EPA/EVERETT KENNEDY BROWN

Japanese National Archives

Japan's National Archives is a world leader in restoration techniques and its conservators are restoring some of the 990,000 documents in the archives - the oldest dates back to 908 A.D. Experts use a variety of traditional and state of the art methods to restore the rare and irreplaceable documents close to their original condition. The National Archives collaborates with one of Japan's traditional paper makers, which innovated the world's thinnest paper at .002 mm, to advance a technique to patch thin Japanese ‘washi’ paper with damaged documents.

 

 

epa03681899 (02/10) Ion Dagan, 88, a Jewish veteran of World War II, holds a photograph of himself when he was a 21-year-old Armored Corps commander in the Red Army, as he sits for a portrait in his home in Tel Aviv, Israel, 23 April 2013. He fought in Ukraine during the war. On 08 of May 1945 the deadliest war in history finished with the surrender of the Nazis, leaving over 60,000,000 people dead. Russia and most of the former Soviet republics commemorate Victory Day on 09 May since it was already 09 May Moscow time when the German military surrender became effective. EPA/ABIR SULTAN

Israel World War II Veterans

The portraits of these veterans show the pride of soldiers and the passage of time through the 68 years since the Allied victory over Nazi-Germany. All these soldiers emigrated to Israel over the decades following the creation of the state. A great number of Jewish joined various armies to fight the Nazis. These included some 500,000 soldiers and sailors from the Soviet Union who fought in the Red Army, as well as some 550,000 Jewish troops fighting in the American armed forces. On 08 of May 1945 the deadliest war in history finished with the surrender of the Nazis, leaving over 60,000,000 people dead.

 

 

epa03685826 (01/14) People watch Bollywood movie 'Dilwale Dulhania Le Jayenge' (DDLJ) starring actor Shahrukh Khan and Kajol ( on screen) at Maratha Mandir, in Mumbai, India, 16 April 2013. The move DDLJ is running from 900 weeks one show daily at Maratha Mandir regardless how many people attends the screening. According to locals the reason for taht is the owner is a big fan of Shahrukh Khan. Indian cinema’s first silent feature film, entitled ‘Raja Harishchandra’ by home-grown film maker Dadasaheb Phalke was released on 03 May 1913. In the 100 years since the movie’s release, the Indian film industry – largely thanks to Bollywood – has become one of the biggest in the world. EPA/DIVYAKANT SOLANKI

100th Anniversary of Indian Cinema

Indian cinema's first silent feature film by home-grown film maker Dadasaheb Phalke was released on 03 May 1913. Known as the 'father of Indian cinema' his movie tells the story of a righteous king, adapted from Hindu mythology. An unusual feature of the film is that all female characters were performed by male actors. In the 100 years since its release, the Indian film industry has become one of the biggest in the world. Although the Bollywood factor has given India a huge new profile, the period of the 1950s to the 1960s is considered as the Golden Age of Cinema, with some of the most acclaimed films being made during this time.

 

 

epa03672560 (12/16) Advertisement billboards that have stopped carrying any message for a long time now, stand at the main ring-road of Athens, Greece, 03 April 2013. Worn by time and assaulted by bad weather, the message the billboards convey is the absence of message nowdays. As turnover in retail trade has dropped by 54.6 per cent since 2009, the advertising companies that own the billboards have suffered greatly from the economic crisis, as those advertised, in their attempts to reduce operational costs, have slashed their advertising expenses. EPA/ALKIS KONSTANTINIDIS

Empty Billboards

Just as ancient temples remind humanity of the once great Greek Empire, empty billboards represent Greece’s current situation. They can be now easily found in Greece’s capital, Athens. They are ragged and empty, or else carrying posters so old that the sun has bleached them illegible. As, for the moment, it is not certainly known if there are no plans to be removed, they remain, in a way, as monuments of the past, and the message they convey is the absence of message. As turnover in retail trade has dropped by 54.6 per cent since 2009 the advertising companies that own the billboards have suffered greatly from the economic crisis.

 

 

epa03660545 (13/24) Muay Thai young girl boxers Maewmeaw Palangvimut (R) clinches with Nongmilk Jitmuangnon (L) during their 25 kg Thai boxing bout at a temporary ring in Bangkok, Thailand, 26 March 2013. Thai Boxing or Muay Thai is a form of martial arts that has its roots in ancient Thai battles, also known as 'the art of eight weapons' with the combined use of fists, knees, elbows and legs. EPA/RUNGROJ YONGRIT

Child Boxing

Thai Boxing or Muay Thai is a national sport. It is a form of martial arts that has its roots in ancient Thai battles, also known as 'the art of eight weapons' with the combined use of fists, knees, elbows and legs and is popular as a professional and recreational sport in Thailand - not only among adults. Children also train and fight the ancient Thai sport. The rule of standard boxing stadiums is that the child boxer needs to weigh 100 pounds (45 kg), the normal weight of a Thai 14 to 15 year old. However, younger children, some aged only 8-years-old, do take part in fights outside of professional stadiums and at local festivals.

 

 

epa03689196 (03/21) 'Dwarf Empire' cast member Zhu Hui, aged 24, stands in her fairy costume before going on stage at the Dwarf Empire theme park outside Kunming, China's Yunnan province, 04 April 2013. The Dwarf Empire theme park opened in mid-2009, employing a number of dwarves to create the show. Depending on what type of job they do at the park, employees earn between 800-2,000 CNY (100-250 Euros) per month, most of which goes towards their savings as lodging is provided, and their living quarters are equipped with kitchens where they prepare their own meals. EPA/DIEGO AZUBEL

Dwarf Empire in Kunmin

Outside Kunming, China, lies a butterfly ecological garden nestled on an artificial hill created by a Chinese entrepreneur. The main attraction on the hill though is a group of performers taking part in a production called 'Dwarf Empire'. Chinese entrepreneur Chen Mingjing opened the theme park in 2009, employing a number of dwarves to create the show. Despite criticism from diverse groups calling the whole idea 'barbaric' and an 'exploitation of less fortunate people,' he as well as the employees see it as a positive initiative which allows them to earn a living.

 

 

epa03719800 (01/17) Jesus Hernandez, 30, shows how he leaves his underground foxhole that he dug out of the river sediment in the Tijuana River canal, which has become home to hundreds of people deported from the US, in Tijuana, Mexico, 03 May 2013. Hernandez had been living undocumented in the US since he was six-years old, but was deported 18 months ago and has since been living in the river canal. Heightened US border security and record numbers of deportations from the US have created a growing population of people who live homeless in Mexican cities that border with the United States. Many had lived for years undocumented in the US and have little or no family and other support in Mexico, and are subject to fall into depression, substance abuse and crime. Tijuana, Mexico, borders on the US city of San Diego, California. EPA/DAVID MAUNG

Homeless Deportees in Tijuana

In recent years Mexican cities along the US-Mexico border have seen a dramatic rise in the number of homeless people, a majority being deportees from the United States. Heightened border security and record numbers of deportations from the US have contributed significantly to the growing population of homeless. Many had lived undocumented for decades in the US maintaining jobs and raising families. In the past few years the Tijuana River canal has become a popular spot for these people to live in makeshift encampments and foxhole hideaways dug into the sediment.

 

 

epa03722164 (1/15) A Buddhist priest attends the Daihanya Buddhist Spring Festival at the Fukujuji Buddhist temple in Miharu, 40 km from the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, in the Fukushima prefecture, Japan, 28 April 2013. The Daihanya festival is an ancient Buddhist purification event held every spring. EPA/EVERETT KENNEDY BROWN

Fukushima Buddhist Spring Festival

A positive fall-out from the triple catastrophes of March 2011 is the Daihanya Buddhist Spring Festival held at the Fukujuji temple in Miharu, Japan. The festival supports the mental welfare of victims of the wave of devastation. Temple members invite these victims to the festival to help them overcome the trauma they have experienced – and in many cases continue to. One of the leading lights behind the ‘project’ is Fukushima resident Genyu Sokyu, a Buddhist monk and major literary award winning novelist has vowed to remain in Fukushima.

 

 

epa03698388 (17/17) Nazia (R) and her husband, leper patient Noor-u-Din (L) feed their children in their room at the leprosy hospital in Srinagar, the summer capital of Indian Kashmir, 30 April 2013. The leprosy hospital was founded by the British around 1891. At present there are just over a hundred patients living with their families in the hospital run by the Kashmir state government. The patients live in the same mud made structures which were built by the British over a century ago, most of them under unhygienic conditions and without proper sanitation. EPA/FAROOQ KHAN

Leprosy Hospital in Srinagar

Life for lepers in the hospitalized colony in Srinagar, India, is not easy and not only because of their health condition. Their living conditions at the hospital deteriorate yearly with insufficient food, crumbling accommodation and lack of clothing. A monthly government grant of 400 INR (about 5.68 EUR) means they run out of basic food items long before the month is out and cost of medical care is beyond their reach. The huts built by the British over a century ago are in dilapidated condition although the hospital is maintained by the Kashmir state government.

 

 

epa03680817 (01/26) Young township dancers practice their jumps or 'saute' as they attend a weekly outreach program hosted by the South African Mzanzi Ballet (SAMB) company in the Alexandra Township, in Johannesburg, South Africa, 29 January 2013. Alexandra Township is the oldest in Johannesburg and was once home to Nelson Mandela. Established in July 2012, South African Mzanzi Ballet (SAMB) is one of just two full-time professional ballet companies in South Africa. Under the auspices of SAMB, an extensive outreach program offers free ballet lessons to over 300 dancers from townships in and around Johannesburg. The ultimate aim is to select talented dancers for further training at the SAMB Academy and finally, for employment with the company as professional dancers. EPA/KIM LUDBROOK

South African Mzanzi Ballet

Established in 2012, South African Mzanzi Ballet (SAMB) is one of just two full-time professional ballet companies in South Africa. In addition to the professional company an extensive outreach program offers free ballet lessons to over 300 dancers from townships in and around Johannesburg. Young dancers from the age of 5 to 16 learn movement, body, spatial and language skills through their regular ballet training. Dancers receive free transport and regularly participate in the professional company's major productions and fundraising performances.

 

 

epa03677325 (06/20) A man sells false certificates of education as a woman smokes in a pedestrian underpass in Moscow, Russia, 11 February 2013. The pedestrian underpasses in Moscow are full of diversity, both in terms of the people who pass through them and the services on offer. Shops, temporary market stalls, buskers and art galleries are a staple sight here. For some, the underpass is a way of crossing the street or a shelter to get out of the rain and snow. For others, it is a place of work, somewhere to eat and drink, or even somewhere to sleep. EPA/YURI KOCHETKOV

Pedestrian Underpass Life in Moscow

The underpasses of Moscow, Russia, are full of diversity, both in terms of the people who pass through them and the services on offer. Temporary market stalls, shops, buskers, impromptu concerts and art galleries are a staple sight here. For some, the underpass is a way of crossing the street. For others, it is a place of work, somewhere to eat and drink, or even somewhere to sleep. They are also an underground territory for those in search of fake work permits, medical documents, insurance, and certificates of education, to name but a few.

 

 

epa03663745 (07/16) A young ethnic Tai Yai boy dressed in colorful costume looks on during Poi Sang Long festival, a rite celebration of Buddhist novice ordination at Wat Hua Wiang temple in Mae Hong Song province, northern Thailand, 03 April 2013. Poi Sang Long is a Buddhist novice ordination ceremony, of the Thai Yai tribal people, but unlike any other ceremony of its type in the country. Young boys aged between 7 and 14 are ordained as novices to learn Buddhist doctrines. EPA/RUNGROJ YONGRIT

Poi Sang Long

Poi Sang Long is a Buddhist novice ordination ceremony - custom and tradition of the ethnic Tai Yai tribe who migrated from Myanmar. The ceremonies begin with the boys having their eyebrows and heads shaved by monks and parents before being bathed and anointed with sacred water. The three-day ceremonies start early morning at the temple where the young boys are made up and outfitted with magnificent costumes. Then, the boys are carried in procession around the town to pay respect, beg pardon and receive blessings from their friends and relatives.

 

 

epa03657489 (01/19) Guests prepare in a private room of The Grand Hotel before attending the Imperial Ball in Paris, France, 06 April 2013. The annual ball is organized by French charity 'Les Oeuvres des Saints Anges' (lit: Work of the Holy Angels) and its President, Baroness de Saint-Didier. EPA/YOAN VALAT

The Imperial Ball

The annual Imperial Ball is an occasion to travel back in time to the French Second Empire. Guests from all around the world dress up in sumptuous ball gowns, costumes and evening wear for the benefit event, organized by French charity ‘Work of the Holy Angels’. Some participants prepare in a private room of the hotel as some crinoline dresses require the assistance of many people to be put on. Around 7.30 pm, everyone gathers in the Salon Ravel for a cocktail reception. Following the candlelight dinner, the guests dance the quadrille, waltz and other traditional dances in the Opera Ballroom, adorned by mimosa bunches.

 

 

epa03656597 (12/12) Revellers spray their bags of colored powder during the first Holi One Color festival in Cape Town, South Africa, 02 March 2013. Recently in Cape Town and Johannesburg, South Africa, a commercial adaptation called the Holi One Colour Festival, was witnessed by thousands of party goers dancing to professional DJ's and every hour the festival would count down to a massive explosion of colored paint as the revellers threw bags of powdered paint into the air and onto friends and other festival goers. EPA/KIM LUDBROOK

Holi One Party

Once a year the Hindu festival of Holi celebrates the beginning of spring as thousands of people enjoy the ritual of covering themselves in colored powder as a mark of their spirituality. Holi falls on the last full moon day of the lunar month Phalguna, which was on 27 March this year. In South Africa a commercial adaptation called the Holi One Colour Festival was witnessed by thousands of party goers dancing to professional DJ's and every hour the festival would count down to a massive explosion of colored paint.

 

 

 

epa03647541 (11/29) Helichrysum kilimanjari, so-called Everlastings, on the Shira Plateau of the Kilimanjaro, Africa's highest mountain, Tanzania, 10 February 2013. Climbing Kilimajaro is tough, however the treks include a reasonable number of days for acclimatisation, giving a large number of visitors a better chance to succeed in reaching the summit. Although it is not a technically difficult climb the altitude can take it toll on climbers. EPA/GERNOT HENSEL

Kilimajaro Lemosho Trek

Lemosho hike is among the prettiest routes to climb Mount Kilimanjaro as it grants scenic views along the way with a low volume of tourist traffic. Thousands of tourists travel to Tanzania every year to trek the 5,895 meter high mount. Climbing Kilimajaro is tough; however the treks include a reasonable number of days for acclimatization, giving a large number of visitors a better chance to succeed in reaching the summit. Although it is not a technically difficult climb the altitude can take its toll on climbers.

 

 

 

epa03644249 (01/19) A young dancer watches the competition during the World Irish Dancing Championships held in Boston, Massachusetts, USA, 24 March 2013. Competitors wear makeup, wigs and often use spray tanning to complete their appearance. Over six thousand competitors from around the world descended on Boston to compete in the 43rd World Irish Dancing Championships, a competition previously held only once outside of Ireland or Scotland, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 2009. EPA/CJ GUNTHER

World Irish Dancing Championships

Over six thousand competitors descended on Boston for the 43rd World Irish Dancing Championships. Representatives from around the globe have come to compete with the Irish, English, Scottish and US dancers. Traditional Irish dancing, once outlawed in the 17th century, saw a rise in popularity following the stage productions of ‘Riverdance’ and ‘Michael Flatley’s Lord of the Dance.’ The dancers’ precise, fast-paced timing and rhythm come alive to traditional music played on fiddle, flute, tin whistle, accordion, bodhran and piano.

 

 

epa03639872 (11/15) A selection of hand made mineral pigments, used by Japanese traditional, Nihonga, painters on display at the shop of fifth generation paint maker Norihiro Ishida (not pictured) in Kyoto, Japan, 13 March 2013. Ishida's shop, called Hokodo, is the oldest paint supplies shop in Japan dating back to the mid 19th century. The shop, which specializes in hand made paints made primarily from mineral sources is patronized by Japan's leading painters. The shop handles over 1,000 colors and is renowned for the ability to create almost any color from natural mineral and organic pigments. EPA/EVERETT KENNEDY BROWN

Traditional Paint Maker in Kyoto

Norihiro Ishida's paint shop, called Hokodo, is the oldest in Japan, started in the mid-1800s, and is patronized by the country's top painters who spend upwards of tens of thousands of dollars for hand crafted mineral pigments. 'Since the first known cave paintings in southern France, mankind has been making colorful pigments from natural mineral sources,' he says. 'While synthetic paints have become popular since the 19th century, our shop holds to the tradition of making paints exclusively from natural mineral and organic sources.'

 

 

epa03631123 (15/25) Romanian inmates, members of the Jilava penitentiary therapeutic community, with giant syringes perform a pantomime show in front of an international audience, during the International Conference on Mental Health and Addiction in Prisons 2013, at the Culture Ministry headquarters, in Bucharest, Romania, 27 February 2013. The drug therapy offers psychological assistance to the residents, group and art therapy and therapies organized by the Romanian anti-Drug Agency and re-integration programs. EPA/ROBERT GHEMENT

Drug Therapy in Romanian Prisons

Bucharest’s Jilava penitentiary may be one of the city’s oldest, as well as most infamous, prisons, but it boasts one of the most progressive programs of rehabilitation for its inmates thanks to a grant through the EEA Financial Mechanism. Through this financial help the penitentiary has developed an in-house therapeutic community made up of staff members to help inmates overcome their problems with narcotics. The project enables up to 26 inmates to receive essential therapy for a period of six months.

 

 

 

epa03611830 (01/27) Wearing white protective masks and suits, Yuzo Mihara (L) and his wife Yuko pose for photographs on a deserted street in the town of Namie, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, 22 February 2013, in the Fukushima nuclear disaster exclusion zone. Following the 11 March 2011 earthquake, tsunami and nuclear disaster, tens of thousands of people lost their homes and are still living in temporary homes. Like over 100,000 people that are now 'nuclear refugees', the 21,000 residents of Namie had to abandon their homes after the town was evacuated following the nuclear alert. Even if most of former Namie residents still hope to go back to their homes in the future, they are only allowed to return home for a few hours to minimize radiation exposure, and clean their houses. EPA/FRANCK ROBICHON

Greek Workers Experiment

In the northern port city of Thessaloniki the Industrial Mining S.A. was considered as one of the major producers and distributors of building materials. But it was unable to survive the impact of the financial crisis which has left Greece with an unemployment rate over 25 percent. It closed in fall 2011 making around 150 workers redundant. The 38 remaining members of the workers’ union decided to occupy the plant, reopen it and run it themselves, following the abandonment of the industry by its former management and the bankruptcy of the mother company Philkeram Johnson. Running as a collective, their motto is: 'If they can't, we can'.

 

 

epa03621257 (01/19) Carlos Lovell, 85, shows the pure spring water he uses to make corn sour mash whiskey at the Ivy Mountain Distillery in Clarkesville, Georgia, USA, 26 February 2013. The Lovell family began distilling the once illegal moonshine 150 years ago in the north Georgia mountains. Carlos and his younger brother Fred learned how to make moonshine when they were teenagers, and continued making the 95 proof spirits until the early 1960s, but now have resumed their craft legally. EPA/ERIK S. LESSER

Legal Moonshine Distillery

Virgil Lovell told his son Carlos at an early age, "If you make good liquor and put it barrels, it would be the same as money in the bank." That was almost 70 years ago when his father taught him and his brother Fred how to make sour mash corn whiskey. Now, after being out of the illegal moonshine business since 1960, they are back to their old craft of making Georgia moonshine from corn, rye, wheat, corn and barley malt, and their own spring water; but now under the auspices of a state distillery license at the Ivy Mountain Distillery in Mt. Airy, Georgia.

 

 

epa03606186 A photograph made available 01 March 2013 shows a couple watching a film at the open air Cinema Somgande during the Panafrican Film and Television Festival in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso 25 February 2013. The Panafrican Film and Television Festival of Ouagadougou known as FESPACO is the largest film festival in Africa. Nearly 170 films from all over the continent are shown during the week long bi-annual festival which is now in its 23rd edition. Some 101 films vie for the top Etalon d'Or prize with all of the juries for the different categories presided this year by women. This year's theme focused on African cinema and politics. EPA/NIC BOTHMA

Pan African Film Festival

As the sun sets Ouagadougou comes alive with a hive of activity as it plays host to Africa's most prominent film festival FESPACO - the largest film festival in Africa. Nearly 170 films from all over the continent are shown during the bi-annual festival running from 23 February until 02 March 2013. 101 films vy for the top Etalon d'Or prize with all of the juries for the different categories presided this year by women. This year's theme focused on African cinema and politics. The film culture in this unlikely place runs deep with the theatres screening films year round.

 

 

epa03611830 (01/27) Wearing white protective masks and suits, Yuzo Mihara (L) and his wife Yuko pose for photographs on a deserted street in the town of Namie, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, 22 February 2013, in the Fukushima nuclear disaster exclusion zone. Following the 11 March 2011 earthquake, tsunami and nuclear disaster, tens of thousands of people lost their homes and are still living in temporary homes. Like over 100,000 people that are now 'nuclear refugees', the 21,000 residents of Namie had to abandon their homes after the town was evacuated following the nuclear alert. Even if most of former Namie residents still hope to go back to their homes in the future, they are only allowed to return home for a few hours to minimize radiation exposure, and clean their houses. EPA/FRANCK ROBICHON

In the Fukushima Exclusion Zone

Following the 11 March 2011 earthquake, tsunami and nuclear disaster in Japan, tens of thousands of people lost their homes and are still living in temporary homes. Like over 100,000 people that are now 'nuclear refugees', the 21,000 residents of Namie in the Fukushima prefecture had to abandon their homes after the town was evacuated following the nuclear alert. Located within the 20-kilometer exclusion zone, Namie saw its coastal area in Ukedo wiped out by the tsunami and its inland zone contaminated by radiations.

 

 

Stadiou Street in Athens

Stadiou Street is a major street that links Athens' largest squares, Omonia and Syntagma, facing Greece's Parliament building. The street follows ancient routes of Classical Athens and was one of the first streets to be built in modern Athens. Nowdays the site reflects the turbulent economic times that Greece is going through, often becoming witness of rallies and riots. Its present bears nothing of its past glory as a popular shopping destination. A third of the stores have closed down near Omonia Square.

 

 

Ashram for Indian Widows

Widows in India are considered highly inauspicious according to Hindu tradition and are often ostracized by society. They may not remarry and must renounce all earthly pleasures. This means wearing only simple white saris and fasting several times a month. As many widows in India are abandoned by their families and cast out by society many make their way to the holy towns of Vrindavan or Banara. Here they live a cast-away life, waiting for salvation, living in shelters or ashrams, begging for a livelihood by singing holy hymns or bhajans.

 

 

epa03602280 (01/24) Papal souvenirs are on sale in front of the Apostolic Palace of Castel Gandolfo, Pope's summer residence, on the outskirts of Rome, Italy, 20 February 2013. Pope Benedict XVI announced on 11 February 2013 that he will officially step down on 28 February, citing advanced age and declining health. On the last day of his pontificate, the Pope is due to take a helicopter to Castel Gandolfo where he will stay during the conclave. EPA/ALESSANDRO DI MEO

Castel Gandolfo, The Papal Summer Retreat

Pope Benedict XVI announced on 11 February 2013 that he will officially step down on 28 February, citing advanced age and declining health. On the last day of his pontificate, the Pope is due to take a helicopter to Castel Gandolfo. He will stay at his summer residence, until the convent of Mater Ecclesiae at the Vatican, where he is expected to finally settle, is restored. His retirement at Castel Gandolfo will prevent him from influencing the election of his successor, Vatican spokesman Father Federico Lombardi said.

 

 

epa03603805 (20/20) A woman leans on her broom in front of her hut in a shantytown inhabited by Roma or Gypsy people in the Craica neighborhood of Baia Mare, northwestern Romania, 05 February 2013. Local authorities have been demolishing the shanties and rehousing Roma families in various types of accommodation, ranging from disused factories to old government offices, since 2011. Whilst they consider the group as illegal squatters, others argue that the forced evictions violate the rights of the Roma. The local government says that it is trying to lift the Roma out of poverty by giving them better housing and improving their access to education and employment. As of February 2013, plans to build modern social housing for the Roma consisting of 500 homes are in limbo, whilst funding is finalized and the search for a suitable site continues. EPA/ZSOLT CZEGLEDI

Roma Life on the Margins

Baia Mare has a population of about 150,000 people and lies near the Romanian borders with Hungary and Ukraine. According to the census of 2011, the ethnic makeup of the city is around 84 percent Romanian, 12 percent Hungarian and 3 percent Roma. An estimated 10-12 million Roma live throughout Europe, making them one of the EU’s biggest ethnic minorities. Originally around 1,500 Roma people lived in a shantytown called Craica on the outskirts of the city. Selling scrap iron salvaged from abandoned mines in the area is their main source of income.

 

 

epa03590667 (07/26) Shrief Kamel (R) poses for photographs with an unidentified woman at Somerset House during London Fashion Week Fall/Winter 2013 in London, Britain, 15 February 2013. The fashion week runs from 15 to 19 February. EPA/KERIM OKTEN

London Fashion Week Fall / Winter 2013

Flying in from New York before travelling to Milan, the fashion industry makes a stop in London to present its Fall/Winter 2013 collections. Over five days models, designers, buyers, bloggers, photographers, makeup artists, hair dressers, celebrities and hipsters congregate at Somerset House for a celebration of cutting edge style. Style is not only reserved to the catwalk. Guests also compete in creativity, often going to extreme lengths to be the coolest cat in town. And London certainly has its fair share of cool cats.

 

 

 

epa03591482 (01/20) Wang Wenbin (L), 24, a member of 'Longzaitian' or 'Dragon in the Sky' Shadow Puppet Troupe, is hugged by fellow member Sun Li (C), 22, during a moment of camaraderie as Jia Pan, 22, looks on in their dormitory, in Beijing, China, 29 January 2013. The troupe consists of close to 50 members who look like children but are actually dwarfs with an average age of 22 and height of 1.26 metres. Formed in 2008, the troupe started out with less than ten members but gradually grew in fame and stature, drawing many other dwarfs from all parts of China who seek to be accepted in a community of their own. The troupe provides training, food, accommodation and income for the members as well as a sense of belonging and pride in their work preserving the ancient art of shadow puppetry. Dwarfs have traditionally been viewed as disabled people in China and are often discriminated by mainstream society. EPA/HOW HWEE YOUNG

Dwarfs Shadow Puppet Troupe

'Longzaitian' or 'Dragon in the Sky' Shadow Puppet Troupe consists of close to 50 members who look like children but are actually dwarfs with an average age of 22. Formed in 2008, the troupe started out with less than ten members but gradually grew in fame and stature, drawing many other dwarfs from all parts of China who seek to be accepted in a community of their own. The troupe provides training, food, accommodation and income for the members as well as a sense of belonging and pride in their work preserving the ancient art of shadow puppetry.

 

 

epa03567922 (16/20) Japanese artist Jun Kaneko, aged 36, with his one-year-old daughter Tao at his home in Fukushima city, 60 kilometers from the damaged Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant in Fukushima prefecture, Japan, 27 January 2013. Kaneko's wife became pregnant one month before the March 11, 2011 earth quake and nuclear disaster. As their daughter was born healthy he and his wife decided to continue living in Fukushima. Kaneko was born and grew up in Fukushima, and frequently exhibits in Tokyo and has exhibited in the US and Europe. He is one of the growing number of young creative people choosing Fukushima as their home and work base. EPA/EVERETT KENNEDY BROWN

Young Creators in Fukushima

While many young people with small children have left the Fukushima prefecture in Japan following the 11 March 2011 earthquake, tsunami and nuclear accident for health precautions there is a growing number of young people returning to the area and moving to Fukushima for the first time to pursue their creative careers. Due to the area's proximity to Tokyo by super express train and the abundant nature and hot springs, the area has been an attractive location for living. Following 3.11, the area is attracting young people devoted to create a new vision for Japan.

 

 

epa03560378 (14/31) Four year old Malian boy Mohamad Sangare poses for a photograph in the street in which he lives in Diabaly, Mali, 26 January 2013. This photograph is part of a picture package of portraits showing children living along the same street in the small rice growing community of the northern Malian town of Diabaly who in the month of January 2013 lived through a rapid chain of events in the Malian war. EPA/NIC BOTHMA

Children of Diabaly

These children are residents living along the same street in the small community of the northern Malian town of Diabaly who lived through a rapid chain of events in the Malian war. On 14 January 2013, the Jihadists vandalised the town's church desecrating all the religious symbols, raided shops and took down the Malian flag. For eight days the children lived in fear with these Jihadists amongst them. Then the French attacked with precision airstrikes. While some children were injured, the majority remained unharmed physically.

 

 

Participants in the men's wheelchair tennis doubles give high five during their game at the Australian Open Grand Slam tennis tournament in Melbourne, Australia, 25 January 2013. Wheelchair Tennis took place in the First Grand Slam of the Year In Melbourne Park from 23-28 January 2013, Australia. The top seven ranked players from the various countries plus a wirldcard entry participated from the men and women events. In the 1970s Brad Parks, an acrobatic skier who suffered an injury which leaves him paraplegic, and wheelchair athlete Jeff Minnenbraker started promoting wheelchair tennis. In 1977 the Los Angeles City Parks and Recreation Department hosted the first ever wheelchair tennis tournament with around 20 players. EPA/Narendra Shrestha

Wheelchair Tennis

From 23-28 January 2013 wheelchair tennis took place in the first Grand Slam of the year in Melbourne Park, Australia. The top seven ranked players from various countries plus a wildcard entry participated in the events. In the 1970s Brad Parks, an acrobatic skier who suffered an injury leaving him paraplegic, and wheelchair athlete Jeff Minnenbraker started promoting wheelchair tennis. In 1977 the Los Angeles City Parks and Recreation Department hosted the first ever wheelchair tennis tournament with around 20 players.

 

 

Toxic Villages - Photo Essay

Toxic Villages

While the heavy smog in Beijing and much of northern China over the past few days have caused alarm among residents and renewed scrutiny on the pollution woes of the country, villagers in a small town of Hubei Province have been grappling with severe air, water and noise pollution over the past two years. Many villagers complained of intensifying respiratory, heart, skin and circulatory illnesses caused by the pollution and a large spike in cancer diagnoses and deaths since the factories were built.

 

 

 

epa03498279 (17/17) A Nepalese man wash his face after completing a high hill race as part of a physical training session, organized by a private institute in Phokhara who prepares them for the British Gurkha soldier recruitment selection, at Malam Mountain in Kaski district, Nepal, 18 November 2012. The British Gurkha soldier recruitment selection process started on 23 November and runs untill the end of December 2012 at British Gurkha camp situated in Pokhara City, Nepal. Around 125 youths will be selected from more than three thousands participants. Those selected will join the British Army, a selection which carries much prestige and admiration throughout Nepalese society. EPA/NARENDRA SHRESTHA

The Making of a Gurkha Soldier

Thousands of Nepalese youths from across the country take part in an eight month-long private training programme in the Kaski district, preparing them for the demands of the British Gurkha soldier recruitment selection in Nepal. Around 125 youths will be selected from more than three thousands participants. Those selected will join the British Army, a selection which carries much prestige and admiration throughout Nepalese society. Since 1947, the British government has been appointing Nepalese youths to British Army.

 

 

epa03518052 (01/20) A teenager plays guitar at a Roma camp, east of Paris, France, 17 October 2012. The Roma camp that was created about eight months ago hosts four families. It is composed with a dozen of makeshift shelter housing. France's new Socialist government since coming into power in 2012 has been breaking up illegal Roma camps and deporting their inhabitants back to Eastern Europe. An estimated 15,000 foreign Roma were living in illegal camps across France in the summer of 2012. Coming mainly from Bulgaria and Romania, the Roma people have the right to enter France without a visa but, under special rules, they must have work or residency permits if they wish to stay in the country longer than three months. EPA/YOAN VALAT

Roma Camp near Paris

The camp located east of Paris, France, hosts four families each with four or five children. Most of the families who live in the camp were forced move there after they had been evacuated from a camp in Noisy le Grand in mid-October 2012. Composed of a dozen of makeshift shelter housing units, the new camp in the east of the French capital has poor sanitary conditions but the families live there to stay together and be better able to help each other. An estimated 15,000 foreign Roma people were living in illegal camps across France in the summer of 2012.