epa Photo Essays 2019

A view on the renewed house at Montefiore Street from 1920 designed by architect Isaac Schwartz in the International Style as part of the 'White City' Bauhaus ensemble in Tel Aviv, Israel, 10 December 2018. Nestled in the streets of downtown Tel Aviv stands the modernist architectural gem known as the White City: one of the largest concentrations of around 4,000 buildings created in the renowned 1930s Bauhaus style. The UN declared the Israeli White City a World Cultural Heritage site in 2003 triggering a renewed interest in the modernist complex. German architect Walter Gropius founded the Staatliche Bauhaus school of art, architecture and design in the city of Weimar in 1919, from where the emblematic architectural movement known as the International Style was developed. The year 2019 marks the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Bauhaus school and as such the Bauhaus Association is set to celebrate the centenary worldwide with numerous exhibitions, events, research projects and more under the motto 'Rethinking the World.' EPA-EFE/ABIR SULTAN

White City

Nestled in downtown Tel Aviv stands a modernist architectural gem known as the White City: one of the largest concentrations of buildings created in the renowned 1930s Bauhaus style. German architect Walter Gropius founded the Staatliche Bauhaus school of art, architecture and design in Weimar in 1919, from where the emblematic architectural movement known as the International Style was developed. The rise of the Nazi Regime in 1933 forced the school to close, leading many graduates of the art school to emigrate from Europe. Among the Bauhaus graduates were several Jewish architects including Arieh Sharon, Shmuel Mestechkin, Munio Gitai-Weinraub and Shlomo Bernstein who moved to Palestine and helped the Jewish community to shape and build the future state of Israel.

 

 

 

epa07270678 (19/30) A group of explorers during a reconnaissance trip on ski randonee on the Edson Glacier, in the Ellsworth Mountains, Antarctica, 05 December 2018. The Glaciar Union camp is a Chilean polar station operated by the INACH and the three groups of the Armed Forces of Chile marking the beginning of all scientific activities planned in Antarctica for the summer season. During a month a group of eight scientists conduct their studies in the third most southern camp of the continent. The Armed Forces play a key role as they provide the logistics and help researchers in their tasks. They explore the surroundings, prepare field trips with scientists and ensure their safety at all times.  EPA-EFE/FELIPE TRUEBA

The New Antarctic Explorers

In a new age of exploration in Antarctica, Chile's Armed Forces are playing a vital role in making it possible for scientists to carry out their research on the world's southernmost continent. Antarctica is vast, almost twice the size of Australia, and only a select number of persons ever get to set foot on this continent. While it does not have any indigenous inhabitants, its population varies between 1,000 people in winter and 5,000 in summer. Most are researchers and station personnel spread across the 66 bases scattered along its coasts. The golden days of Antarctic exploration of the past century saw the likes of Norway's Roald Amundsen and Briton Robert Falcon Scott. Today's expeditions see teams of scientists and soldiers embark on new adventures on the White Continent with more technology at their disposal than ever before.

 

 

 

Joniel (17) rests on the ground after smoking the drug 'cripy' at the district of 'Las Mercedes' in Caracas, Venezuela, 08 November 2018. The streets of Venezuela’s capital, Caracas, are filled with homeless children who run, laugh, swim in polluted rivers, search for food among the trash and, in many cases, abuse drugs that allow them some respite from the harsh realities of living rough. These neglected minors represent one of the many faces of the severe economic and social crisis ravaging the oil-rich South American country. EPA-EFE/MIGUEL GUTIERREZ

The Smallest Faces of Venezuela's Crisis

The streets of Venezuela's capital Caracas are filled with homeless children. Children who run, laugh, search for food among the trash and swim in polluted rivers. And children who abuse drugs that allow them some respite from the harsh realities of living rough. These neglected minors represent one of the many faces of the severe economic and social crisis ravaging the oil-rich South American country. Over the span of two months, efe-epa photojournalist Miguel Gutierrez documented the day-to-day lives of these children, presented here in a four-part photo essay: 1: Portrait Series, 2: Life on the Streets, 3: Liliana (17) Gives Birth to Baby Boy, 4: Homes for Abandoned Children. The children mostly live in public spaces in Caracas, where, apart from begging, they have set up an elaborate system to survive.