2020

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epa Photo Essays 2020

obs-cu-ra: Pandemic Camera Obscura Portraits

Throughout the history of art, the window as a point of view is a recurring motif among painters, portraitists, filmmakers, and visual artists in general. Amid the global confinements imposed by Covid-19, contemporary artists are finding renewed significance and meaning in these windows. Windows have started to represent the border between the outside and the inside world, between society and solitude, between freedom and confinement. Photographer Bruno Alencastro, keen to illustrate the strange times that the world is living through during times of lockdown and quarantine, settled on the idea of the 'camera obscura', or 'dark chamber'. He sealed off his apartment from any light source and projected the outside image in his living room. He invited other photographers who agreed to transform their homes into large-format pinhole cameras, and captured their lives in times of quarantine, confinement and lockdowns.

Mathias Rocha (8) and Lucia Rocha (6)(R) pose for a portrait at their home in Tres Coroas, Brazil, 01 May 2020. The portrait was taken by their father Pedro Rocha and was done in a tent on the high grass next to their house. Having kids at home during lockdown can be very difficult for parents, luckily, Pedro and his children leave next to the wilderness and they can explore nature with little human contact. The series obs-cu-ra is organized by photographer Bruno Alencastro and the portraits were made by se
A commuter wearing a face mask is reflected in a train window as it arrives at the platform of Shibuya train station in Tokyo, Japan, 14 April 2020, a week after the Japanese government declared a state of emergency on parts of Japan including Tokyo and Osaka, in a bid to slow the spread of the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 which causes the Covid-19 disease.  EPA-EFE/DAI KUROKAWA

Japan in a State of Emergency

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on 16 April expanded a state of emergency to the entire country, after originally only declaring one in limited parts of the country, as the nation struggles to slow the spread of the coronavirus. The government is requesting companies and employers to allow employees work from home in a bid to reduce commutes by 70 percent, but many workers in the capital are unable or not allowed to do so, resulting in tens of thousands commuting in packed trains and stations in key areas of the city. The government is also asking bars and restaurants to remain closed or reduce their business hours. While many shops are heeding calls from the government to remain closed, some bars and restaurants have been defying the government requests and remaining open nightly with customers sitting side by side with their face masks pulled down to their chins, seemingly complacent to the social distancing guidelines.

People Who Stayed Outside to Be Beside Us

Ever since the COVID-19 disease caused by the new coronavirus knocked on the door of our country, Greece, with the announcement of the first confirmed case, our daily life has radically changed. We#ve acquired new habits, we've even distanced ourselves from our loved ones, we’re wearing face masks, we’ve filled our pockets with antiseptic wipes and sprays and – most importantly – we’ve learned to 'stay home.' But this does not apply to everyone. There are some citizens who do leave their homes, risking their health so that the rest of us stay healthy and remain safely inside. People whose profession, conscience and sense of responsibility do not let them stay confined within the security that their houses provide.

Camera operator Giannis Mentzos, 49, wearing a protective face mask and gloves poses for a picture as he films a news anchor during the lockdown of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, at the headquarters of state broadcaster ERT in Athens, Greece, 25 April 2020. During the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, we acquired new habits, we even distanced ourselves from our loved ones, we wore masks, we filled our pockets with antiseptic wipes and sprays and most importantly, we learned to 'Stay hom
A group of researchers walks along the Bellingshausen Dome in the King George Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica, 10 March 2020. Ash of a volcanic eruption in a nearby island in the late sixties surfaces as the glacier keeps melting. The darker surface attracts more heat that in turn accelerates the thaw. Every year the Chilean Antarctic Institute (INACH) organizes an Antarctic Scientific Expedition (ECA) to the White Continent in its 56th edition 49 projects carried out fieldwork, with over 5

Antarctica - Science on Another Planet

Every year the Chilean Antarctic Institute organizes an Antarctic Scientific Expedition (ECA) to the White Continent – the 56th campaign included 49 projects carrying out fieldwork. Scientists began arriving in July 2019 with the last group closing bases by late March 2020. This was the longest campaign ever organized by the Institute, despite serious external setbacks: Chile faced months of social turmoil and the devasting crash of a logistical support plane that killed all 38 people on board. A further complication was the recent Covid-19 outbreak. A total of 505 people took part in the 56th ECA, ranging from logistical support specialists to scientists. The nature of investigations varied from climate change in the region to biotechnology, to the presence of human footprints and analysis of the Antarctic ecosystem.

Czech National Ballet Dancers Training at Home During COVID-19 Disease

The coronavirus shutdown has affected every aspect of Czech life, including the arts and the country’s most famous National Theater, which is home to the Czech National Ballet. The nationwide quarantine has forced all non-essential workers into home confinement. For ballet dancers whose profession requires a rigorous exercise routine, these new restrictions pose major challenges to keep fit and ready to put on a show. The ballrooms in the historical center of Prague are empty, and the dancers have to take care of their condition by themselves, in their apartments, with their families, but they are helped by video-training sessions with their ballet masters.

Patrik Holecek, soloist of The Czech National Ballet, jumps as he practices at home in Prague, Czech Republic, 01 April 2020. The coronavirus first appeared in the Czech Republic on 01 March 2020, and the government was one of the earliest in Europe to impose a full lockdown to slow the spread which affected every aspect of life, including the Czech National Ballet.The nationwide quarantine forced all non-essential workers, including artists, into home confinement. For ballet dancers whose profession requir
Ian Clegg poses for a portrait in his home in north London, Britain, 31 March 2020. Clegg is freelance builder who can work but most clients have cancelled jobs. He says, 'People don't want you in their house and even if they did, a lot of builders merchants stores are closed. But it is amazing that people are people welcoming and calm. When I was younger Irew up in Rhodesia during the sanctions and this feels similar. Then people worked together they helped each other - we learned skills to survive even gr

Portraits from London Lockdown

On March 23 Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson implemented social distancing measures banning social gatherings and groups of more than two people. People must stand more than two metres apart as several European countries have closed borders, schools as well as public facilities, and have cancelled most major sports and entertainment events in order to prevent the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus causing the Covid-19 disease. The UK government rules are to only go outside for food, health reasons or work (but only if you cannot work from home). If you go out, stay 2 metres (6ft) away from other people at all times and do not meet others, even friends or family. This means for most people in the United Kingdom, life has completely changed.

Paleontological Expedition into the Heart of Chilean Patagonia

A valley in the Southern tip of Chile, dubbed as the Rosetta Stone of Paleontology in the Southern hemisphere. New findings of well-preserved fossils of vertebrates, invertebrates, and plants from the Cretaceous period could be the key to unlocking significant tracts of the common past of South America and Antarctica.

Every year the Chilean Antarctic Institute (INACH) and the Universidad de Chile organize a paleontological expedition to shed some light on the end of the Cretaceous period when dinosaurs became extinct. In its 10th anniversary the expedition, a group of 20 researchers of various disciplines, embarked on a two-week journey into the heart of Chilean Patagonia.

A group of paleontologists works on a fossil outcrop in the Valley of Las Chinas, in the Chilean Patagonia, Chile, 24 February 2020. The grid around the finding helps to plan and control future work on the site. In its 10th edition, a multidisciplinary group of scientists from Chile, Argentina, Brasil and Hungary took part in a two-week-long paleontological expedition in the Magallanes and Chilean Antarctica Region. Geologists, paleobotanists and biologists worked on terrain discovering vertebrate fossils,